kay ngee tan architects: singapore pavilion at shanghai expo 2010

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singapore pavilion at shanghai expo 2010 by kay ngee tan architects

‘urban symphony’ is the name of the singapore pavilion by kay ngee tan architects
for the shanghai expo 2010. the pavilion will span 3000sqm designed to resemble
a music box, consisting of three parts. four columns of different shapes and sizes
support its structural system and floors above. the ground floor will showcase projected
images, live theatre performances and activities within the atrium space and main hall.

urban symphony aims to show rhythm and beat through the pavilion’s architecture
of water fountain movements, window and sunshade fins layouts on the façade, with
the interplay of sounds and visuals on different levels.

the pavilion will be constructed from recyclable aluminum and steel for the facade
and reinforced concrete for the foundations, floor slabs and columns.

view at night

levels of pavilion

rooftop garden

interior

interior

model of ‘urban symphony’

buchner brundler architects: swiss pavilion at shanghai expo 2010

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swiss pavilion by buchner bründler architects
image courtesy of the swiss FDFA

the swiss federal department of foreign affairs(FDFA) has sent designboom an exclusive
preview of the swiss pavilion for shanghai expo 2010 which we are happy to share with
our readers.

buchner bründler architects is responsible for the concept of the pavilion which is meant
to be a representation of a hybrid, interconnected urban area where nature and technology,
innovation and sustainability function and interact in symbiosis.

on the rooftop of the pavilion there is a chairlift, a representation of the rural parts of switzerland.
it provides views of the venue and funnels downwards into the structure itself. the pavilion’s façade
is an enclosed semi-transparent curtain of woven metal netting suspended from a height of 20 m.
within this mesh-like exterior, 11 000 solar cells are attached in a random fashion. each cell is
independent of one another, but together create an electronic circuit board feeding an interactive
light-play on the façade of the structure which occurs when the solar cells, two double-layer
condensors(high-performance energy accumulators), a light emitting diode and sensors react to
light and activity in neighbouring cells.

the solar cells produce electricity which is stored in a condensor and used when the light emitting
diode flashes. regardless of intensity, light falling on one part of the façade increases the light sensor’s
transmit impulse, causing the light-emitting diodes on that particular section of the façade to flash.
the cells then light up for a long or short period of time depending on the intensity of light they receive.
the intensity of the light emitted by the diodes also varies according to the energy stored and the
level of ambient light present. the same reaction occurs during the night. electro-magnetic impulses
influence the light behaviour of each cell, influencing neighbouring cells when they light,
resulting in a chain reaction across the exterior.

the front side of the pavilion represents the view of switzerland. a white outline of the country,
representing rural areas, can be made out behind the surface. the electronics and the circuits
are visible from the same side and symbolize the urban parts of the country.

when the expos is over, the façade will be recycled. each cell will be sold as a souvenir,
a kind of message which is meant to express the innovation and sustainability of switzerland.

detail

the façade is a knit metal curtain suspended at 20 m high
image courtesy of buchner bründler architects

general view of the pavilion which includes a rooftop chairlift
image courtesy of the swiss FDFA

detail of the rooftop chairlift which spirals down into the pavilion

detail of the rooftop chairlift
image courtesy of the swiss FDFA

internal view
image courtesy of the swiss FDFA

detail of the façade from inside the pavilion

the chairlift funnels downwards into the structure itself
image courtesy of the swiss FDFA

the chairlift funneling down inside the pavilion

image courtesy of the swiss FDFA

image courtesy of buchner bründler architects

the solar cells of the façade light up for a long or short period of time depending on the intensity of light they receive
image courtesy of the swiss FDFA

detail of the 11 000 solar sells which are randomly placed along the woven metal netting which makes up the façade

image courtesy of the swiss FDFA

image courtesy of the swiss FDFA

image courtesy of the swiss FDFA

profile view
image courtesy of buchner bründler architects

JKMM architects: finnish pavilion at shanghai expo 2010

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‘kirnu’ (‘giant’s kettle) is JKMM architects winning design for the finnish pavilion at the
shanghai world expo 2010
. head designer of the project is architect teemu kurkela.
the overall vision for the pavilion was to portray finland in a microcosm, as a miniature city,
with the interior of the pavilion tells stories of finland and its people.

finnish pavilion – kirnu
image courtesy of JKMM architects

the story of finland begins in the times of the ice ages, when the country was covered by a
several kilometer thick layer of ice, whose movement shaped the coastline, lakes and islands
of finnish land. the ice age also created giant’s kettles, cavities naturally formed in a bedrock
as a result of heavy ice drilling stones through this bedrock. a hollow space resembling one
of these giant’s kettles can also be found in the center of the finnish pavilion, kirnu.

the sculptural architecture of kirnu draws on nature. the pavilion is to be considered something
like an island, its formal language, free without symmetry. it will be surrounded by a mirror of water,
with its surface covered by shingles resembling those of fish scales. as one begins to approach
the building, the subtle, scaly surface will begin to take shape. visitors will walk on a bridge
towards the main entrance, whose sheer fabric surfaces will form a portal to the pavilion.
the wooden floor will resemble that of a dock, with the smell of tar. there is also a gently sloping
ramp ascending within the thick walls of kirnu’s exhibition hall, a high space which winds around
the atrium. after the exhibition hall, the ramp continues downward to the exit, shop and restaurant area.

the pavilion was designed entirely by computer with the environment and sustainability taken
into consideration. energy consumption will be minimized, with heat stress caused by the sun
reduced by the direction in which the facilities face. the thick atrium walls, building materials
and construction methods have been selected with the aim of minimizing CO2 emissions.
the most visible example of the reuse and recycling of materials can be found in the pavilion’s façade.
the scale-like shingles are made of a mixture of paper and plastic which are a recycled product
of the industry. therefore, waste is recycled into a new construction material, a paper-plastic
composite which is waterproof.

the natural elements of water and sky are main elements of the architecture. people, nature
and technology have come together and the pavilion will provide a forum for discussions
about development policies for a better life.

exterior day view
image courtesy of JKMM architects

image courtesy of JKMM architects

image courtesy of JKMM architects

exterior night view
image courtesy of JKMM architects

image courtesy of JKMM architects

image courtesy of JKMM architects

the textured exterior surface which resembles fish scales
image courtesy of JKMM architects

image courtesy of JKMM architects

rendered detail of scales which are made of a recycled paper and plastic composite
image courtesy of JKMM architects

rendering detail of scales
image courtesy of JKMM architects

image courtesy of JKMM architects

image courtesy of JKMM architects

image courtesy of JKMM architects

the entrance is small and shady, the inner atrium opening towards the sky and the clouds
image courtesy of JKMM architects

the VIP entrance area
image courtesy of JKMM architects

VIP reception area
image courtesy of JKMM architects

the sloping ramp which ascends the pavilion’s walls
image courtesy of JKMM architects

interior view of ramp
image courtesy of JKMM architects

image courtesy of JKMM architects

image courtesy of JKMM architects

image courtesy of JKMM architects

image courtesy of JKMM architects

image courtesy of JKMM architects

VIP lounging space
image courtesy of JKMM architects

image courtesy of JKMM architects

sheer walls of fabric form a portal within the pavilion
image courtesy of JKMM architects

model of the finnish pavilion
image courtesy of JKMM architects

structural rendering of the pavilion
image courtesy of JKMM architects

image courtesy of JKMM architects

aerial floor plan with large graphics of fish ‘swimming’ through the space
image courtesy of JKMM architects

image courtesy of JKMM architects

image courtesy of JKMM architects

split profile view
image courtesy of JKMM architects
Popout

Finland Pavilion Kirnu from finlandatexpo2010 on Vimeo.

thomas heatherwick: british pavilion at shanghai expo 2010

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british pavilion sits on a landscape which resembles an unfolded piece of paper

the concept behind thomas heatherwick‘s british pavilion at shanghai expo2010,
is an enclosure that throws outwards from all sides, a mass of long radiating cilia.

the centerpiece of the pavilion is the seed cathedral, a six storey high cube-like structure,
pierced by approximately 60 000 7.5m long slim transparent acrylic rods which sway gently
in response to any wind movement. during the day each of these rods will act like fibre
optic filaments, drawing on daylight in order to illuminate the interior. at night, light sources
at the interior end of each rod will allow the whole structure to glow from the outside.

the pavilion will be situated on a landscape which resembles paper which once wrapped
the building, but now lies unfolded on the site. the surrounding space will provide an open venue
for public events and along with shelter for visitors.

approximately 60 000 7.5 m long acrylic rods create the effect of fibre optics on the building’s exterior

interior view

japanese pavilion at shanghai expo2010

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the huge ‘breathing organism’ pavilion

situated on a 6 000 square meter plot, the 24-meter-high japanese pavilionwill be the largest
the country has ever built for the world expo. it is also among one of the largest pavilions at
shanghai expo 2010. the structure has been officially nicknamed ‘zi can dao'(‘purple silkworm island’)
in reference to its color and shape.

the pavilion will be divided into past, present and future exhibitions. these three zones –
wonders of connections, from ‘connections of knowledge’ to ‘connections between people’
and balancing ‘connections between people’ and the future – present the connections and exchanges
between japan and china, technologies and human activities for resolving issues facing humankind
and ideas for the future of the earth with humans living in harmony with the environment.

the semi-circular ‘breathing organism’ will make efficient use of natural resources,
incorporating solar energy collection batteries and a double-layer membrane that can filter sunshine
to coincide with its interpretation of how technology can better our lives. energy-saving technologies
will be on display and performances will be staged, highlighting the role of ecological technology
in helping humans achieve a more comfortable life and confidence in the future.

regarding the design, visitors will experience some chinese elements at the japan pavilion,
involve characters and traditional chinese architectural styles. the exhibition will include a history
of japanese diplomatic envoys visiting china. there will also be some intelligent robots as part
of the pavilion, but officials have declined to reveal any other information, as to keep the exhibition
plans as a surprise.

aerial view

detail of the membrane

the pavilion by night

the building has three floors

see video here

exhibition space

exhibition space

exhibition space

exhibition space

russian pavilion at shanghai expo2010

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russian pavilion at shanghai expo 2010

the russian pavilion at shanghai expo 2010 consists of 12 white towers inspired
by traditional russian women’s costume. a 15 meter tall central building will link
the towers.

the 20-meter towers, in white, red and gold, will duplicate the ancient ural towns dating
back 3,000 years ago, but given a modern touch with their irregular shapes.

inside the three story buildings, there will be a display of scenes from the fairy tale
‘the adventures of dunno and his friends’ written by children’s author nikolay nosov.

german pavilion at shanghai expo2010

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the german pavilion at shangahi 2010

the german pavilion, ‘balancity’, will be completed around april 2010 for theshanghai expo,
said its chief architect lennart wiechell.

the 6,000-square-meter structure will be germany’s largest at any expo. it will showcase
german urban life and how the country’s design and products can help solve urbanization
problems.

rather than being conceived as a building, the pavilion is meant to be a three-dimensional
walk-through sculpture with no defined interior or exterior. for visitors the journey
will start at the harbour and lead through gardens and parks, via a town planning office
and a factory and past the opera to end at the ‘energy source’, the city’s power plant.

the german pavilion at shangahi 2010

isometric drawing of the exhibition structures

the ‘energy source’

the factory

the park

the opera

german art and cultural scene

an underwater escalator

the planning office

the planning office

miralles tagliabue EMBT: spanish pavillion at shanghai expo 2010

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spanish pavillion for shanghai 2010
image courtesy miralles tagliabue EMBT

miralles tagliabue EMBT have been awarded the prize for the top future project at
the world architecture festival 09, for their design of the spanish pavillion.

their project brings the traditional spanish craft of wicker basketwork up to date on
the curves of a highly modern pavilion aiming to transform an old tradition into new life.

‘an expo is about national identity and about knowing and mixing’, says architect
benedetta tagliabue. ‘so we would like some of the pavilion made in spain and some
in china or asia. wicker technology is the same across the world’.

since winning the competition to design and build spain’s pavilion at the2010 shanghai expo
in january 2007, EMBT has investigated lots of ways to create ‘vegetal’ structures, eventually
settling on willow (salix). the research has taken EMBT to factories in germany and artisans
in spain. ‘it is a very deep and beautiful craftsmanship’, tagliabue says. ‘it is an ancient skill
and a magical world. they go through the complete process from harvesting to selling the wicker product’. pont de querós in barcelona has been involved in discussions and development
prototypes from an early stage.

essentially the plan is for panels of woven willow stems to be hung as a skin from the bones
of steel supports. tagliabue likes the combination of the easy to build, solid and highly controlled
steel structure and the hugely flexible wicker panels which will allow the complex geometry of
the drawings to be realised. the pavilion is conceived as a series of baskets, some open at the top
and some enclosed, creating a dappled light in courtyards, circulation and multipurpose spaces.

EMBT wants to keep the junction between the steel frame and willow panels as simple as possible, especially as the panels are likely to have to be produced by different artisans, and the weave
is being kept simple – the pattern based on the arrangement of panels. EMBT’s design is based on different chinese characters. it will be impossible to read but for the subliminal text will talk about ‘maximum systems’ such as the moon, sun and sky. the colours of the wicker –from the red brown
to white – will be achieved by the treatments it would naturally go though: stripping, maintaining
the skin, or treating it to make it more durable.

image courtesy miralles tagliabue EMBT

model of the pavillion
image courtesy miralles tagliabue EMBT

image courtesy miralles tagliabue EMBT

image courtesy miralles tagliabue EMBT

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